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Understanding the Impact of a Fragmented Coronoid Process of the Elbow for Dogs

Understanding the Impact of a Fragmented Coronoid Process of the Elbow for Dogs

A fragmented coronoid process of the elbow for dogs is one condition that requires specialized veterinary care, and it is most commonly diagnosed in young canines.

If you have adopted a young dog, you will likely enjoy many years of fun with your new companion. As your new friend ages and adjusts to their new home, you will notice their quirks and personality start to shine through. Unfortunately, some guardians also see the appearance of health problems and conditions that require specialized veterinary care. A fragmented coronoid process of the elbow for dogs is one such condition, and it is most commonly diagnosed in young canines. Read on to learn more about the impact that a fragmented coronoid process of the elbow can have on your companion.

What is a Fragmented Coronoid Process of the Elbow?

A fragmented coronoid process (or FCP) is one form of elbow dysplasia caused by a developmental defect in one of the coronoid processes in the elbow joint. The ulna, one of the three main bones in a canine’s elbow, has two bony structures called “coronoid processes.” When a veterinarian diagnoses a fragmented coronoid process of the elbow for dogs, this means that one of the structures has begun to crack or split away from the ulna.

Symptoms and Risk Factors

When a patient has a fragmented coronoid process, the fissure can result in instability, pain, or lameness in the affected limb. Canines may also display decreased mobility, warm or swollen joints, and pain when the joint is manipulated. This condition is particularly prevalent in large dog breeds and often develops between five and eleven months of age. Males are thought to be more prone to FCP than females, and things like nutritional deficiencies, trauma, and growth abnormalities can be contributing factors.

Diagnosing and Treating a Fragmented Coronoid Process of the Elbow for Dogs

Guardians often notice lameness or decreased mobility in their companions at the start of the diagnostic process, and veterinary professionals may order radiographs for any issues that appear severe or last for more than two weeks. For young dogs, radiographs may require light anesthesia and a veterinary radiologist for accurate results. Radiographs can miss FCP in some cases, and a CT scan may be necessary to diagnose the condition in its early stages. Treatment for FCP almost always includes orthopedic surgery, and removal of the affected bone is common.

Trust Maryland Veterinary Surgical Services With Your Companion’s Health

Your companion’s health is important, and the team at MVSS is ready to provide the best care possible for your furry family. We are dedicated to combining comprehensive exams and assessments with informative and honest discussions of your companion’s care. Once we have worked with you to decide on the best course of action for your dog, our professionals will use their surgical expertise to work towards the goal of giving your companion an active and pain-free life. We are proud to serve loyal companions in Catonsville and Baltimore. To learn more about our services, give us a call at 410-788-4088 or visit us online. For more information and tips for pet health, follow us on Facebook and Pinterest.

This entry was posted on Monday, September 21st, 2020 at 11:52 pm. Both comments and pings are currently closed.